Eco-Friendly Earthship Home in Rural Arkansas Hopes To Encounter a Buyer With $2M – Realtor.com News

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An Earthship home in Harriet, AR, is all about the wide-open spaces—inside and out. The 4,662-square-foot getaway sits on 40 acres.
“When you walk in, you are just totally astounded at the workmanship, the craftsmanship, and the labor that went into building this thing,” says listing agent Randy McCallister, with Goodman Realty Arkansas-Marshall. “It’s almost like a museum—lots of handcrafted work in this house.”
Completed in 2017, the home is now listed for $2 million.
(Adam Miles)
(Adam Miles)
(Adam Miles)
Earthship homes are are a sustainable design concept that calls for natural and upcycled items such as earth-packed tires as construction material.
The whole place is completely off-grid, with solar panels, water catchment systems, generators, and composting toilets.
“It’s definitely one of a kind in this area—there are more of them in the desert areas than here,” McCallister says, adding that the sellers had to adapt the design a bit to account for the sometimes-humid Arkansas climate.
One of the layout’s quirks? The interior of the main house doesn’t afford much privacy.
“There aren’t any bedroom doors,” McCallister notes. “There aren’t any doors inside the house at all, except on the bathrooms. It’s just all open-air inside.”
(Adam Miles)
(Adam Miles)
(Adam Miles)
The kitchen is rounded, and the fireplaces are designed to throw heat into the house instead of it escaping through the chimney.
McCallister says coming up with the list price was a bit difficult.
“This is one of a kind,” he says, adding that there are only about 8,000 people in the small-sized county. “There’s nothing [here] to compare this with.”
The house sits at the highest point of the property on Schnauzer Lane, named for the sellers’ pet project—raising dogs. In fact, there’s a large kennel building attached to the guesthouse.
“They fixed it to where the dogs can go outside and get fresh air, but then they come inside under the roof of where the guesthouse is,” McCallister explains.
(Adam Miles)
(Adam Miles)
The listing also comes with a summer cottage and a workshop/utility/garage building. And there’s a screened-in cabana for outdoor entertaining.
And the home’s rural setting is certainly part of its appeal.
“It’s in the middle of nowhere—except it is close to Buffalo National River, which is a U.S. National Park,” McCallister says. He predicts the buyer will probably be “someone that loves to hunt and is an outdoors person who’s got plenty of money for a second house.”
(Adam Miles)
(Adam Miles)
Tiffani Sherman is a Florida-based writer who covers real estate, finance, and travel.

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